We believe we have build the best projection mapping remote control by Daniel Aspuru

RemoteMapp M reaches App Stores for the first time!

I am very happy to announce that the mobile application I have been using for some time for El Gabinete’s live performances is finally available to the public. This first version is in UAT (User Acceptance Testing) mode in App Stores, and will be officially launched in the beginning of 2019.

This application was born from the necessity of controlling and adjusting the projection mapping software directly in stage, because usually El Gabinete travels across the world with the less crew as possible and sometimes the schedule for mounting the shows is very stretch.

RemoteMapp is a product which will remote control several projection mapping softwares, and it’s first version RemoteMapp M works with Millumin 3 as a desktop software. We chose Millumin because it’s a great software we use a lot of times in our live performances.

Here is a quick silent demo of the most important features of RemoteMapp M. Please go to the RemoteMapp M Product Page here to see details, install the app or see the User’s Manual.

We’ll keep you informed!

Happy new year 2019!

Daniel

Philip Glass testing our technology by Daniel Aspuru

Philip Glass in the University of Claustro de Sor Juana, CDMX

Philip Glass in the University of Claustro de Sor Juana, CDMX

In this month, Philip Glass came to our studio to rehearsal and mount his performance with Erasmo Medina and Daniel Medina, two musicians from the Wirarika culture. At the venue, we used LoudMapp to sync a projection mapping in a cube during his performance. 

As our tools are developed by musicians, embedding the technology in Philip's performance was flawless and rich. The concert needed a strong contextual meaning, and that is why Philip's team chose Loud-Pixel's tools. 

 

During soundcheck, water and text syncing tests

During soundcheck, water and text syncing tests

Philip Glass and Daniel Medina watching the nierika projected in our studio. That was the first test in daylight, that is why the projection does not glow that much, but the first reaction of Philip was great! 

Philip Glass and Daniel Medina watching the nierika projected in our studio. That was the first test in daylight, that is why the projection does not glow that much, but the first reaction of Philip was great! 

Now we are working for a project with his team for next year in the Palace of Fine Arts (Palacio de Bellas Artes) in Mexico City. He has been declared as an early adopter of our technology and we will make the official announcement soon. 

One page that was published one day after the concert by the newspaper La Jornada

One page that was published one day after the concert by the newspaper La Jornada

Second generation prototype in action by Daniel Aspuru

Two years ago, my band El Gabinete and me was starting to use the second generation of hardware prototypes I made. In this song, the video mapping scene, the audio mixer's scene, the analog effect of the piano, the initial video fade in and fadeout are controlled through my mobile phone with just two taps. This prototype triggers all that events through an ethernet network and allows me to concentrate and enjoy playing the piano part. 

All worked fine, and that night was really magical, I hope you enjoy...

First STAGEFREAK tests, done. by Jesús Tamez-Duque

It's been a long day -actually, a long couple of months-, but STAGEFREAK is finally up and running as an iOS app + hardware integration prototype, controlling our YAMAHA sound console.

So far, we've got ten different setups for ten different songs and everything's running nicely.

This first setup is focused on our band's electric guitars, integrating five different pedals, the central console and two individual amplifiers. We haven't yet tested it with our keyboards or microphones, but adapting the hardware to their specific electronics should not be that difficult.

It's 2:40am in the morning, so I guess we'll call it a night. 

Tomorrow we can start thinking about product aesthetic design.

Messing around with self-taught electronics. by Jesús Tamez-Duque

After playing music for so long, I guess it was only natural that I wanted to try to add something more to it. We live in the age of technology, after all.

The Wind Transducer (Transductor Éolico -the original name, in spanish-) was a definite surprise to me in the sense that it came out of a simple idea of mine, of creating music through machines, and that it resulted of so much interest to so many people around. 

So I did lose the chance to get a patent out of it (lesson learnt) but I suppose I gained the confidence to explore deeper into technology focused on the artistic industry. 

I've got a lot of ideas. Maybe I can put into use some of the "engineering" things that I've picked up here and there. Perhaps I can give it another shot see what comes out of this.